Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David Reichert’s district, Washington’s 8th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 7,600 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $75 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 84,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 630,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 143,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 143,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $33.4 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 79,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 489,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David Reichert’s district, Washington’s 8th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 7,600 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $75 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 84,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 630,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 143,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 143,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $33.4 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 79,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 489,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in Montana, which is represented by House Republican Denny Rehberg:
Increase prescription drug costs for 10,800 Medicare beneficiaries in the state who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $106 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 162,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the state.
Deny 700,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the state access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits. 
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 159,000 individuals in the state who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 159,000 individuals in the state between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $37.1 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the state will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 83,000 individuals in the state who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 545,000 individuals in the state who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in Montana, which is represented by House Republican Denny Rehberg:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 10,800 Medicare beneficiaries in the state who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $106 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 162,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the state.
  • Deny 700,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the state access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits. 
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 159,000 individuals in the state who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 159,000 individuals in the state between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $37.1 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the state will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 83,000 individuals in the state who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 545,000 individuals in the state who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Ron Paul’s district, Texas’ 14th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 8,900 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $87 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 95,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 590,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 127,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 127,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $29.7 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 71,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 459,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Ron Paul’s district, Texas’ 14th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 8,900 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $87 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 95,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 590,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 127,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 127,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $29.7 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 71,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 459,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David McKinley‘s district, West Virginia’s 1st Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 13,700 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $135 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 120,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 420,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 96,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 96,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $22.4 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 51,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 326,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David McKinley‘s district, West Virginia’s 1st Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 13,700 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $135 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 120,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 420,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 96,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 96,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $22.4 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 51,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 326,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Walter Jones' district, North Carolina’s 3rd Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 7,100 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $70 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 108,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 103,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 103,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $24.1 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 54,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 426,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Walter Jones' district, North Carolina’s 3rd Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 7,100 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $70 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 108,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 103,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 103,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $24.1 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 54,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 426,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Jeff Fortenberry’s district, Nebraska’s 1st Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 8,700 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $86 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 91,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 460,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 91,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 91,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $21.3 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 49,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 372,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Jeff Fortenberry’s district, Nebraska’s 1st Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 8,700 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $86 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 91,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 460,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 91,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 91,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $21.3 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 49,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 372,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David Dreier’s district, California’s 26th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 8,600 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $85 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 89,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 540,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 124,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 124,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $29.0 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 67,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 417,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican David Dreier’s district, California’s 26th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 8,600 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $85 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 89,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 540,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 124,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 124,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $29.0 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 67,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 417,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican John Culberson’s district, Texas’ 7th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 7,800 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $77 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 80,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 620,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 122,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 122,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $28.5 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 67,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 495,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican John Culberson’s district, Texas’ 7th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 7,800 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $77 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 80,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 620,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 122,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 122,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $28.5 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 67,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 495,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican John Campbell’s district, California’s 48th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 10,300 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $102 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 92,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 120,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 120,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $28.0 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 69,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 413,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican John Campbell’s district, California’s 48th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 10,300 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $102 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 92,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 120,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 120,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $28.0 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 69,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 413,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.
Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 
Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Todd Young’s district, Indiana’s 9th Congressional District:
Increase prescription drug costs for 10,400 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $102 million for drugs over the next decade.
Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 113,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 115,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
Require the 115,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $26.9 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 64,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 417,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.

Rep. Henry A. Waxman, Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr., Ranking Member of the Health Subcommittee, have released new analysis detailing the impact of the Republican Medicare proposal on each congressional district. 

Here are the immediate and long-term impacts of those changes in House Republican Todd Young’s district, Indiana’s 9th Congressional District:

  • Increase prescription drug costs for 10,400 Medicare beneficiaries in the district who enter the Part D donut hole, forcing them to pay an extra $102 million for drugs over the next decade.
  • Eliminate new preventive care benefits for 113,000 Medicare beneficiaries in the district.
  • Deny 530,000 individuals age 54 and younger in the district access to Medicare’s guaranteed benefits.
  • Increase the out-of-pocket costs of health coverage by over $6,000 per year in 2022 and by almost $12,000 per year in 2032 for the 115,000 individuals in the district who are between the ages of 44 and 54.
  • Require the 115,000 individuals in the district between the ages of 44 and 54 to save an additional $26.9 billion for their retirement – an average of $182,000 to $287,000 per individual – to pay for the increased cost of health coverage over their lifetimes. Younger residents of the district will have to save even higher amounts to cover their additional medical costs.
  • Raise the Medicare eligibility age by at least one year to age 66 or more for 64,000 individuals in the district who are age 44 to 49 and by two years to age 67 for 417,000 individuals in the district who are age 43 or younger.